TODAY, Saturday, January 20th, 2018, is the WritersWeekly.com Winter 2018 24-Hour Short Story Contest!

The topic is posted right here.

Success Story

Pinching Myself By Jennifer Bond Reed

Long ago, if anyone had told me I'd be doing what I'm doing today, I'd have laughed really hard. I still have to pinch myself as I roll out of bed and meander to the computer in my PJs to work. Writing is the best job in the world because it gives you the freedom to be your own boss, make your own decisions and enjoy the successes. But, it didn't happen all at once. It took a lot of goal setting, work, perseverance and dreaming big! …

Make Contacts in the Community By Susana Molinolo

In the past few months I've gotten writing assignments that I didn't have to grovel for! This to me is the true sign of success -- but it hasn't always been that way. The reason people are now calling me or emailing me is because I reached out to them first. …

Busting Down Opportunity’s Door By Kimberly M. Hutmacher

Most of my writing is concentrated on poetry for children's magazines. Several months ago I found myself in what appeared to be a no-win situation. The children's magazine market was shrinking, rates were dropping, and many more of the publications were insisting upon buying all rights. I needed to find a way to get as much bang for my buck with each poem as possible. But, how was I supposed to do that? …

Busting Down Opportunity’s Door by Kimberly M. Hutmacher

Most of my writing is concentrated on poetry for children's magazines. Several months ago I found myself in what appeared to be a no-win situation. The children's magazine market was shrinking, rates were dropping, and many more of the publications were insisting upon buying all rights. I needed to find a way to get as much bang for my buck with each poem as possible. But, how was I supposed to do that? The answer was sitting in my inbox. I receive a monthly educational ezine geared towards those who teach pre-k thru sixth grade. I'm not a teacher, but I subscribe to the newsletter to shed light on new activities to do with my three small children. As soon as I looked through my current issue, I thought of a possible solution to my problem. …

Self-Publish Your Way to Success! By Kathy Sanborn

There's a myth that if you self-publish, traditional print publishers won't have anything to do with you. I am living, breathing proof that you can self-publish and translate that into a traditional print publishing contract. …

Yikes! My Book Became a Movie! By Sandra Philipson

Yikes! My Book Became a Movie! By Sandra Philipson

This Saturday, August 16th, a family movie titled, Miracle Dogs, will premiere on Animal Planet. The movie is "inspired" by my children's book, Annie Loses Her Leg But Finds Her Way and stars my dogs and book characters, Max and Annie as well as Kate Jackson, Rue McClanahan, Stacy Keach, and other human beings. You might ask if making a movie based on your book was exciting, fun, and most of all, profitable. The answers are yes, yes, and NO (at least not yet). …

Luck Be With You By Justin Silves

Though I've dreamed of being a writer since I began penning my first verses around the age of 14, it's been bad luck that's enabled me to begin my career as a freelancer. I recently took a flying leap of faith into a full time freelance career, though the circumstances that led up to my decision to do so were a little extraordinary. …

Homeschool Mom = Freelance Writer By Michele Howe

I'm a homeschooling mom of four kids. The oldest two are now attending a public high school where my husband teaches upper level mathematics. I've been writing reviews, articles on parenting, and helpful how-tos for about 14 years now. Most of that time, I've had to juggle managing the home, the homeschooling, and life in general with my writing, I long ago discovered that writing for 30 minutes each day produced quite a lot of work. …

Creative Queries and a Dash of Confidence By Melissa Walker

From my window in Brooklyn, I can see Manhattan's shiny, silver Financial District over the rooftops and through the trees. When I worked as an Assistant Editor at a national women's magazine, I hardly ever looked out my windows-I missed the sunny part of the day anyway. But when my magazine folded and I found myself with a bit of severance pay, I decided to open the curtains. …

Filling the Gap By Marion Stroud

I have to confess that when I come across a situation that I don't know how to handle, my first instinct is to run to the bookshop or the library to find a book on the subject. My husband jokingly claims that I don't take a 'pill for every ill' but read a 'book for every situation'. And if there isn't one...well there is a market staring you straight in the face. …

Knowing When to Break or Bend the Rules By Carol R. Cool

Attending my first Christian writers' conference five years ago, I heard all sorts of rules: Always send an SASE. Write what you know. Study several issues of a magazine before querying. Query the little publications first. Write for free to get clips. Nurture your contacts. Anyone willing to work hard can be a writer. …

Browse, Uncover and Write By Sue Sundwall

I am a part time small business owner and a part time freelance writer. If I had to choose between the two, I'd choose the later, but that's not quite an option. Yet. I've been seriously putting my ink scratches to paper for almost a year now and have been amazed at my own success. My aim was supplementary income, but being paid to write can be addictive and enormously satisfying. …

Cat’s Furball Leads to Very Impressive Resume By Felice Prager

Before I had kids, I was a public school English teacher for about a decade. I spent my days teaching grammar, spelling, composition, and literature to students in grades ranging from middle school to high school. There were times that the decade felt more like a millennium, but it was who I was and what I did. When my first child was born, I hung up my pointer and whip, and became a full-time parent, only occasionally wondering about the outside world filled with other people's children. …

WRITING IS HEREDITARY By Suzy Feine

The first children's book I ever wrote was published. My second submission consisted of an article about my pregnancy. It was purchased and published in the Better Homes & Garden's New Baby Book. Still, I had serious doubts about quitting my full-time career to become a writer. …

Success Means Managing Myself By Lisa B. Samalonis

Although the love of writing as been with me since I was a child, the meaning of success has changed through the years. Early victories included a story in the school newspaper or finishing a draft of my novel , written in girlie scrawl in a blue line, black marble hard cover notebook. Later, it meant degrees in journalism, a job as a magazine editor, and traveling abroad for work. …

How I Sold 75 Books in One Day By Roe W. Van Fossen, Author of Dak’s Sisters

After I received my copies of Dak's Sisters from my publisher, Booklocker.com, I approached Schuler's bookstore in Grand Rapids, Michigan to see about getting some books on their shelves. Booklocker.com did a great job getting the book printed and their cover lady, Cathi Stevenson, designed a remarkable cover for me. Seeing the book in print, Schuler's readily agreed and took ten copies on consignment. Those sold rather quickly, so they took another 10, and then set up a book signing for me for a Saturday. …

B.S. Leads to Success By Darlene Trew Crist

My father always used to tell me that I could talk my way through anything so well that I should be an attorney. I agreed with him that my ability to craft an argument was well-tuned, but I didn't want to spend my life defending the bad guys or evil corporations that could afford to pay the exorbitant fees that I envisioned charging. Instead, I sought to follow my heart using my "B.S. Skills," as my father referred to them, to my best advantage on the written page. It has been a long, winding road with some steep hills along the way, but today I am writer and a happy one. …

Market Yourself Constantly By Tara McClellan McAndrew

It was my first official day as a full time freelance. I was still asleep when the phone rang. (Yes, I slept in my first day on the job -- tsk, tsk). It was my editor from a well-known entertainment trade paper. …

You Never Know… By Brad Cook

I built my freelance career on those three words. "You never know," I'd say to myself as I followed up on a job opportunity, hoping it would lead to paying work that I could add to the other paying work I was doing. Eventually, I hoped, that pile of paying work would allow me to become a full-time writer and toss my day job. …

Desperation, Determination and Dumb Luck By Beth Rubin

Little did I know when my marriage broke up--actually, down--that writing would become a lifeline, drawing me out of depression, or that my freelance career was about to take off. My success since then has been due to desperation, determination, and dumb luck. …

Rejected? Change the Rules By Kim Peek

Rejection. It's a problem I've dealt with my whole life. It usually stems from my need to share voluminous amounts of detail with my audience. …

Good Writers Are Good Readers By Damien Roohr

Everything I know about good writing I learned in Portage, Wisconsin in 1981. I was a cub reporter for the local daily paper. On the way back to the office from our standard mid-day fare of beer-boiled brats and string cheese, my friend, Patrick, also a cub reporter and the more talented writer, and I paused at a sidewalk book sale. Patrick handed me Giving Good Weight by one John McPhee. …

Success Breeds Success through WritersWeekly.com by Mary Cook

Certainly you may have my autograph - but no pictures, please! WritersWeekly.com brought me fame and a mailbox bursting with fan mail. Okay, there were eight e-mails, but when you consider that until then I'd only had two fan letters in my 15-year writing life, that was riches indeed. Andy Warhol predicted we would all have our 15 minutes of fame, but mine lasted almost a week. …

Going Back To School By Sandy Siegel

In the '90s, as my television career faded into the sunset, I started to think about switching writing gears. With no degree, experience or connections in other fields, I decided to go back to school, not to get a degree, but to use my college alumni association. …