TANTALIZING SUBJECT LINES! How to Make Almost Anyone Open and Read Your Email/Blog/Article

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As the owner of WritersWeekly.com and BookLocker.com, writers and authors frequently add me to email notifications they send out when they update their website or blog. I’m happy to receive these and I often find interesting and intriguing tidbits in these individuals’ posts. Unfortunately, some of them have great blog posts or website articles but very boring email notifications. They give me (and others) no reason to click. It’s particularly frustrating because adding a tantalizing headline is so simple.

If you don’t make the subject line of your email absolutely irresistible, that email is going to be deleted, unopened. Fortunately, using tantalizing subject lines in your email notifications are not only easy, but also fun!

Here are some examples. Which ones would you be most tempted to click on?

EXAMPLE A –

Writer A posted an article on being ripped off by an editor. They got into a really nasty email argument and the editor threatened her. She wrote about the experience on her website, and sent an email to her readers so they could click to read the article.

The subject line of her email: I updated my website again

Writer B posted an article on being ripped off by an editor. They got into a really nasty email argument and the editor threatened him. He wrote about the experience on his website, and sent an email to his readers so they could click to read the article.

The subject line of his email: Editor threatened to get even with me!!!

EXAMPLE B –

Writer A sends out a weekly email, every Friday, alerting friends, family, colleagues and others who have joined her list that she’s updated her blog with another gardening post. This week, she wrote about bees disappearing, and the possible consequences.

The subject line of her email is: Read my new post!

Writer B sends out a weekly email, every Friday, alerting friends, family, colleagues and others who have joined her list that she’s updated her blog with another gardening post. This week, she wrote about bees disappearing, and the possible consequences.

The subject line of her email is: Bees Disappearing! Could Global Food Shortage Follow?!

EXAMPLE C –

Writer A posts to his blog daily. He covers health and wellness issues. This week, he interviewed the oldest living American.

The subject line of his notification email is: Today’s Post: June 12, 2013

Writer A posts to her blog daily. She covers health and wellness issues. This week, she interviewed the oldest living American.

The subject line of her notification email is: Longevity Secrets from the Oldest Living American!

EXAMPLE D –

Writer A has a weekly TV trivia column. This week, he’s writing about the passing of Jean Stapleton (All in the Family).

The subject line of his email is: Today’s Trivia

Writer B has a weekly TV trivia column. This week, he’s writing about the passing of Jean Stapleton (All in the Family).

The subject line of his email is: Which All in the Family cast member turned down a role in Willy Wonka?

EXAMPLE E –

Writer A has a website for freelance writers (heh…). He received a rude email from a librarian, and wanted to share it with his readers.

The subject line of his email is: My Newsletter for Writers – Enjoy!

Writer B has a website for freelance writers. She received a rude email from a librarian, and wanted to share it with her readers.

The subject line of her email is: Whoo-Whee! Now, That’s One Snotty Librarian!
(Ref: here)

EXAMPLE F – THIS IS A REAL ONE I RECEIVED LAST WEEK

Writer A posts to his blog weekly. This week, he’s writing about the government obtaining phone records on millions of Americans.

The subject line of his email is: Blog Post

Writer B posts to his blog weekly. This week, he’s writing about the government obtaining phone records on millions of Americans.

The subject line of his email is: The govt. has been spying on me and I’m FURIOUS!



Writing an article or posting to a blog takes a lot of time, and a considerable amount of creativity. Don’t drop the ball in the final stretch by failing to get the attention of your readers! Tantalizing headlines are easy and fun to create, and will GREATLY increase the your click-through rates.

Angela Hoy is the co-owner of WritersWeekly.com and BookLocker.com. WritersWeekly.com is the free marketing ezine for writers, which features new paying markets and freelance job listings every Wednesday. According to attorney Mark Levine, author of The Fine Print, WritersWeekly.com and BookLocker.com is: “As close to perfection as you’re going to find in the world of ebook and POD publishing. The ebook royalties are the highest I’ve ever seen, and the print royalties are better than average. BookLocker understands what new authors experience, and have put together a package that is the best in the business. You can’t go wrong here. Plus, they’re selective and won’t publish any manuscript just because it’s accompanied by a check. Also, the web site is well trafficked. If you can find a POD or epublisher with as much integrity and dedication to selling authors’ books, but with lower POD publishing fees, please let me know.”

Read a price comparison of the most popular POD publishers HERE.

Our POD Secrets Revealed Series is HERE.

COMPARE POD PUBLISHERS!

(More details about each firm below appear HERE.)

>> BookLocker: $517 (Deduct $200 if submitting your own cover) <<
Rated “Outstanding” by Mark Levine, attorney and author of The Fine Print of Self-Publishing.
**(If you want to bypass the formal submission process, you can email your manuscript to Angela directly for consideration at angela -at- booklocker.com).

>> Trafford: $624.00 <<
Rated “Publisher to Avoid” by Mark Levine, attorney and author of The Fine Print of Self-Publishing.

>> CreateSpace: $978.00 (Deduct $299 if submitting your own cover) <<
Rated “Just OK” by Mark Levine, attorney and author of The Fine Print of Self-Publishing.

>> Lulu: $1248.00 (Deduct $450 if submitting your own cover) <<
Rated “Pretty Good” by Mark Levine, attorney and author of The Fine Print of Self-Publishing.

>> iUniverse: $1299.00 (includes 5 “free” copies) <<
Rated “Publisher to Avoid” by Mark Levine, attorney and author of The Fine Print of Self-Publishing.

>> AuthorHouse: $1593.00 <<
Rated “Publisher to Avoid” by Mark Levine, attorney and author of The Fine Print of Self-Publishing.

>> Xlibris: $1972.00 – (includes 5 “free” copies) <<
Rated “Publisher to Avoid” by Mark Levine, attorney and author of The Fine Print of Self-Publishing.

***Prices above based on least expensive package offered by each publisher on similar offers targeting U.S. authors. Fees include interior formatting (based on a 200-page book), original cover design with up to 5 images, print proof, ebook creation, up to 25 interior photos/graphics, an ISBN, barcode, a listing on the publisher’s website and distribution by Ingram, all within 6 weeks.

NOTE: All publishers above currently offer distribution through Ingram (the largest book distributor), as well as inclusion of their titles in the major online (amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com, etc.) and physical bookstore systems.

NOTE: Many companies offer perks that others don’t, some try to upsell authors on extraneous services, and a few even claim ownership of files the author has paid them to create. Study each publisher and contract carefully before making your choice.

To find out what BookLocker.com can do for you, see:
http://publishing.booklocker.com/