4 Holiday-Smart Ways to Get More Writing Clients FAST – by Louisa Eunice

4 Holiday-Smart Ways to Get More Writing Clients FAST – by Louisa Eunice

The holidays are here! Everyone talks about putting up a beautiful Christmas tree, drinking eggnog, and good cheer. But wait!

As a freelance writer, the one thing going through your mind is your ability to stay afloat when companies close for a week and your clients are out on holiday. As writing pays your bills, it’s essential to have a good supply of work even as the year comes to a close. As tempting as it may sound, taking a six-week vacation, and putting your work on hold, may not be the best idea. It can take weeks for your writing to pay off and you don’t want to start the new year with a dent in your pocket.

Besides, the most successful writers are always working. To put you on the right path, here are four holiday-smart ways that will help you book more work:

  1. Reach out in style

This is as simple as it sounds! The end of the year is a great time to stay in touch with both past and current clients, and let them know how grateful you are for the working relationship that you had/have. To make it more personable, you can use a thank you card as a way to show your appreciation. This little memento will help you keep your name in front of them.

Ensure your name and email appear on top of the card, and follow up with a short message that clearly states you will be happy to take on any last-minute work to ease their burden as they transition to another year. There are few writers who send notes in the mail or are looking to work during this time of the year, so reaching out in style is a great way to stand out.

  1. Pitch holiday-themed content

There’s nothing better than tailoring your content for the season! A majority of editors are looking to receive holiday-themed content that will resonate with their readers. They are most likely to choose the title “How To Teach Your Kids About Financial Responsibility This Christmas” over “10 Tips For Scaling Up Your Business.”

Clients are equally looking for holiday-related content that will lead to quick sales. Set aside time to brainstorm the best holiday-themed ideas in your niche, discover which ones are selling the most, and send that pitch!

  1. Stay on Twitter

A handful of editors are always tweeting their need for content during the holiday season, and they also hope for quick responses. Freelancers on vacation won’t be able to meet the demand for content immediately and this is where you come in!

As tweets come in quickly, ensure that you are following all relevant editors, and stay close to your search bar. Search words like:

  • need content
  • looking for content
  • freelance writers

Those are bound to bring up the opportunities that you need. Remember to act fast!

  1. Use LinkedIn to send out inquiry emails

A simple inquiry email could go a long way when it comes to landing freelance work during the holidays. There are thousands of brands represented on the site and one thing that they all have in common is that they are always looking to meet all deadlines before the year ends.

The good news is that you can message different company executives on your LinkedIn account. Be sure to introduce yourself as a writer, send warm holiday greetings, and let them know you’re available to take on any last-minute work. You’re sure to hear back because many companies are going through end-year rushes and re-staffing, and need all the help that they can get.

There’s no time to waste so start marketing today!

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Louisa Eunice is a freelance writer who has experience writing B2B and B2C content for a variety of audiences and publications. She also writes short-form marketing content for an array of unique brands. Some past organizations Louisa has worked with include TapDesk, Captive Network, Reviewed, and many more.







The Art and Craft of Writing and Editing


Writing is a constant dialogue between author and reader.



The craft of writing involves an interchange of emotions between an author and a reader. An author creates a story line, conflict, and characters, gives his characters words to speak, and then hands off these materials to a reader. This process results in a constant dialogue between the mental imagery produced by a reader and that proposed by the author.





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