How My 10-Year-Old’s “Later Bedtime” Request Led to a Published Mystery Series! – by Maria Pease

How My 10-Year-Old’s “Later Bedtime” Request Led to a Published Mystery Series! – by Maria Pease

I grew up on Long Island, and I am one of seven kids. I fall in line at number six. When I was six years old, my parents brought home my adorable little sister, who, as the last in line, got a lot of attention growing up.

I was very shy and quiet, and being quiet in a large family is a little like being invisible. No one really notices you and, if by chance you do have something to say, the odds are that no one is listening. That left me with a very good imagination and a fondness for animals. They eagerly listened to me if I did have something to say.

I spent my childhood pretending. As a kid, my playhouse was an elephant that I rode in the jungle, I had a pet monkey who could talk to me telepathically, and my favorite bunny rabbit was in charge of all the other animals in my room, and they all came alive every night.

I did such a good job of pretending that the lines could be a bit blurry when it comes to “real life.” Although I’m much better at playing in the real world now, I still really, really love to live in my own world.

I have always loved stories. I read them, wrote them, and pretended to be in them. The funny thing is…I never even realized that I could keep writing them. I was supposed to get serious about a real career. So, I went to college and ended up with a degree in business, and a degree in legal studies. I probably shouldn’t mention this, but I didn’t like working for lawyers. It just wasn’t as fun as it was in my imagination.

How I Started Writing the Sam Parker Mystery Series

When my son, Steven, was about ten, he asked to stay up a little later than his seven-year-old sister, Ali. Trying to discourage this, I told him he could, but there would be no TV. He could either read or write. He agreed and I found myself in a situation. If he couldn’t watch TV, neither could I. So, we started out reading for a half-hour every night until, one night, he said he’d like to write a story, and thought I should, too.

That night, Samantha Parker was born. The thing is, every night after Steven went to bed, I stayed up writing and, before I knew it, I had written Malicious Intent: A Sam Parker Mystery. People who know me always ask if Samantha is me. I can honestly say that she is not me. Well, not exactly.

You see, Samantha Parker is younger, prettier, braver, and way more adventurous than I am, although I do pretend to be all those things when I need to. Yes, I know where she’s coming from, but the adventure in my life is all because of Sam.

 

Malicious Intent: A Sam Parker Mystery

Samantha Parker is not a cop or a private investigator. She’s a nosy paralegal with a talent for snooping, so when a handsome stranger walks into her office and gives her twenty-five thousand dollars to have her find out who is following him, she can’t resist taking his case, even if she doesn’t believe him…

Malicious Secrets: A Sam Parker Mystery

Samantha Parker is back with a new job as a private investigator and new cases to solve. Frank, her boss, has finally assigned her a big case, one that will surely help her to prove herself. All she has to do is discover what could have happened to a college girl that has been missing for seven months, and find out if she’s dead or alive. With an increasing body count, it won’t be easy…

Malicious Desires: A Sam Parker Mystery

As a private investigator, Samantha Parker has seen her share of darkness, but nothing could have prepared her for the evil she was about to encounter. She’s been assigned to locate a sixteen-year-old boy who has run away from home to meet up with a gaming buddy he met online. With a frantic mother to deal with and few leads to go on, it’s not going to be easy…

Also by Maria Pease:

Writing E-books for Fun and Profit

Writing How To Information For Big Profits

How to Collect Your Small Claims Judgment

Maria Pease is a copywriter originally from Long Island, N.Y. She lives in Temecula, California with her husband, Scott, and her children, Steven and Ali. 

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The Art and Craft of Writing and Editing


Writing is a constant dialogue between author and reader.



The craft of writing involves an interchange of emotions between an author and a reader. An author creates a story line, conflict, and characters, gives his characters words to speak, and then hands off these materials to a reader. This process results in a constant dialogue between the mental imagery produced by a reader and that proposed by the author.





Read more here:


http://writersweekly.com/books/6712.html







The Art and Craft of Writing and Editing


Writing is a constant dialogue between author and reader.



The craft of writing involves an interchange of emotions between an author and a reader. An author creates a story line, conflict, and characters, gives his characters words to speak, and then hands off these materials to a reader. This process results in a constant dialogue between the mental imagery produced by a reader and that proposed by the author.





Read more here:


http://writersweekly.com/books/6712.html





 

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