Readers’ Comments – 02/13/19

Readers’ Comments – 02/13/19

COMMENTS FROM OUR READERS ABOUT:  Our Sailboat Has Been Demasted!

Angela —
I really enjoyed your article! Fun reading about your adventures. But I’m also dismayed… at myself. I have just realized that your name is, ahem, “AHoy”. OMG I’m losing it.

– Doug


By Angela Hoy – Publisher of WritersWeekly.com

I KNOW!! Ha ha ha ha ha!!! 😉

Big hugs,
Angela


I love how you take all of this in stride. It seems each week it’s a new adventure. I loved the videos. I had no idea how big that mast is and how it’s all connected. Very interesting.

– Pamela Allegretto


Growing up north of New Orleans we had a sailboat on RR Ties in the carport several times over those years. Thoroughly enjoyed reading about your refitting.

– Chris Queen


Angela, Can I share your stories and pics with my friends at Houston Yacht Club? Your old stomping grounds in Shore Acres? I think my sailor friends would find your “adventures” very interesting!!!

– Susan Williams


By Angela Hoy – Publisher of WritersWeekly.com

Absolutely!! 😉

Hugs,
Angela


That is one tall mast. I recall only one docked along Seattle’s Montlake Cut that was that tall. And a sailboat where you can stand up inside? That must be marvelous. When I owned a San Juan 21, the interior was crouch-down-only. I bet you even have a shower with running hot water. That’s the way to travel. Mine was more like camping.

– Michael W. Perry


By Angela Hoy – Publisher of WritersWeekly.com

I think the mast is 56 feet. That means we have to be careful when sailing (researching bridge heights!). 😉 We have two heads (bathrooms). They are tiny but they both have toilets and warm showers. Well, the shower is warm if someone else has not showered in the previous hour. Our hot water heater is small. 😉

Hugs,
Angela


66 Feet, actually.

– Brian Whiddon – Managing Editor


Oh. I guess that extra 10 feet might make a difference when going under bridges, huh? 😉

Angela


COMMENTS FROM OUR READERS ABOUT:  What is a “Book Re-publisher” and Why Should Authors Avoid Them at All Costs?

Thank you for the excellent article. I have retweeted it. I have had several calls on my home phone regarding a company that wants to market my book. My name on my home phone is different from my pen name. So these people really do dig. On the first call, I asked how they got my number. There was a lot of hemming and ha-ing, and no real answer. I told them that I don’t need their service and to please not call me again. Right! They have called twice since. On the last call, I told them that I had submitted their number to the FDC as a fraudulent call. Fingers crossed!

– Pamela Allegretto


By Angela Hoy – Publisher of WritersWeekly.com

I’ve been saving all the voicemails I’ve been receiving from one of these scammers so I can write an article about them. 😉

– Angela


$2500 for a book trailer??!! I paid $30 for mine, through a guy in the UK that I found on Fiverr, and I’m extremely pleased with it!

– Jeffrey G. Roberts


I have in fact been contacted by one of these folks.
When it happens (and it isn’t very often) it breaks up my otherwise nose-to-the-keyboard schedule.

Since my company, Royal Knight Incorporated, owns RK-Books.com, I always love to ‘play’ with these guys on the phone. I get them going–really excited about all the possibilities they could have with me, then I drop the bomb — I’m going to send THEM a bill for the time I’ve spent talking with them on the phone!

Hey!
They’ve just told me I’m a ‘star’ – so my time is money back to me*.
(*I have yet to get paid!*)

– Wendy Jones





 



The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication


Practical resource outlining the self-syndication process, step-by-step. Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication for their column or articles.







http://writersweekly.com/books/4693.html