COMMENTS POSTED ABOUT: Profitable New Year’s Resolution? A Daily Word-Count Writing Goal = More Money!!

COMMENTS POSTED ABOUT: Profitable New Year’s Resolution? A Daily Word-Count Writing Goal = More Money!!
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Profitable New Year’s Resolution? A Daily Word-Count Writing Goal = More Money!!

Okay – I tried this over the three day weekend and I was amazed at how much I wrote. The key is TURN OFF YOUR INTERNAL EDITOR. Do not look back at the material written ñ just write more words. Thanks, Angela, for the tip.

– zack7sabrina


This is actually smart! I am glad someone has done serious research into this.

I tried the ‘I can write a page an hour so I will write 4 hrs’ routine and it didn’t work. I would always stop to edit. But saying 750 words – that is doable (especially if you DON’T edit).

– Wendy Lou Jones


Great advice! A little tricky for those of us who are compelled to edit and re-edit and re-edit as we go! But, I’m willing to take the plunge! A big “thank you” for all your help with my novel: Bridge of Sighs and Dreams!

Happy New Year!!! Cheers!!!

Pamela Allegretto
Bridge of Sighs and Dreams


I have always enforced a 1000 word commitment on myself. It’s like you can’t go anywhere until you eat your peas. Stephen King does 2000, to which I aspire.

Constance Lyons


As a linux-head, I have an easier method of counting words. Most Windows and Mac users have been trained to hate and fear the command line. (See the link above for John’s method.)

When writing books, the page count is more important than a the word count. Less than 100 pages is more likely to be a pamphlet. If I change margins, or page size, or font size, or spacing between lines, or even the format of chapter head pages, the page count goes up or down…

Read more of John’s extensive and helpful comments at the link above. Thanks, John!

John Culleton


How to Deal With Your Clients’ TERRIBLE Ideas

I found the tone of this article quite arrogant. In my experience, some business people have difficulty explaining their idea and often define it in cliches. If you can help them articulate their idea clearly, it either 1) is not as unworkable as you first thought or 2) in articulating it, the client sees the problem for him or herself and then asks for your advice. Committees are difficult. If possible, figure out who has the power and aim to please that person.

– Tish Davidson


This article came off as the author sounding extremely arrogant. He makes his clients seem like petulant children rather than his bread and butter. Work with your client rather than believing that your ‘massive intellect’ gives you license to look down on them. Here’s to hoping that none of your former, current or future clients ever has the displeasure of stumbling across this article.

– Rebecca Christman


While Ryan’s suggestions to deflect bad ideas are good, I would suggest a writer not assume the client is stupid or unprofessional right from the beginning, otherwise no matter how hard you try to hide it, your arrogance is going to show.

– Jana Joujan


Getting Pooped Upon…and Six Other Reasons to Reject a Client
When to Fire a Client
Recycle Your Clients!
Educating Your Client
Creative Client Cons

Read More Letters and Comments


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