legal

BookBaby’s Unfair Contract Clause! By Angela Hoy

BookBaby’s Unfair Contract Clause! By Angela Hoy

We were recently contacted by an author who was unhappy with BookBaby, and wanted to move his book to BookLocker. But, after sending us his files, and discussing formatting, etc., he asked about how to terminate his contract with BookBaby. I told him to read his BookBaby contract, find the termination clause, and follow the instructions there. He found his contract, read it, and wrote me back, not at all happy with what he discovered…

Copyright Law Basics For Fan Fiction Authors By Harvey Randall, Esq.

Copyright Law Basics For Fan Fiction Authors By Harvey Randall, Esq.

The aphorism “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery” is typically attributed to Charles Caleb Colton. If Colton studied law, clearly he was absent the day “Copyright Law” was discussed. When it comes to writing, imitation is frowned upon and there are many traps and obstacles for the unwary “fan fiction” author.

You May Own the “Copyright”…But You DON’T Own the Book Rights!

You May Own the “Copyright”…But You DON’T Own the Book Rights!

Could you give me your opinion? Last summer, I sold a short story to a publisher who put it into an e-book anthology. The contract I signed said that I retained the copyright, but the publisher had exclusive rights to publish the story in hardback BOOK form, paperback BOOK form, electronic BOOK form, and audio BOOK form. I found somewhere that pays well for previously published stories, and sells them as e-stories. My husband said it would be the same as an e-book, and would violate my contract. I say that it is like an old 78 rpm single–just one song from a record album. What do you think?

Does My Non-fiction Book REALLY Need a Disclaimer?

Does My Non-fiction Book REALLY Need a Disclaimer?

My publisher inserted a disclaimer in my book. I got upset and asked that it be removed. They refused. I don’t understand why I have to admit to readers that I’m not a licensed financial advisor …

Writers Beware: Are You Using Stolen Art Without Knowing It? By Tiana Bodine

When pulling art or photography from the Internet, most authors know to be careful about copyright protection. Most of the work found online cannot be copied without the expectation of a DMAC take-down notice from an artist’s attorney, so most writers focus their searches on stock photo sites instead. These sites, usually owned by massive multimedia conglomerates, sell licenses to photographs and vector artwork at reasonable prices. Professional and DIY cover designers alike rely on stock sites as a source of affordable, safe art. Unfortunately, not all stock art is trustworthy…