Letters and Comments

More Play-Doh-ectomy Stories

Hi, Ang - Ah, Frank brings back motherhood memories... One day when my daughter was about three or four years old, I noticed her rubbing her nose rather frantically and sniffling. I got a tissue, told her to blow into it, and nothing resulted. Something told me to look into her nose, and I was greeted with what looked like a sizeable blood clot blocking one nostril. It wouldn't budge no matter how much she blew into the tissue and, in my increasing panic, I "rationalized" that I somehow just had to get air into the nostril again. I prayed the clot wasn't connected to her brain as I grabbed tweezers, made contact, and pulled out a plump purplish blob. A voice in my head told me to smell it. It was a raisin. Happy New Year to all! Best, Susan --- Hi Angela, I had to laugh when I read the letters from other readers about what they put in their ears or nose. It reminded me of the time when I was a child visiting my grandparents and I had two M & Ms left and no pockets in my clothes. Since I wanted to save the M & Ms for later, I put them in my nose. Fortunately, my grandmother was able to get them out without a trip to the ER. These days I never save chocolate for later! Mary Jo --- Your article reminded me of my youngest daughter, Maria, who, at two, kept pulling on me and trying to tell me, until I got it, that she had put a round thing up her nose, like dried bean. But she wouldn't let me make any attempt to get it out with tweezers. Finally, I called nurse who live next door. She calmly, as she spoke and diverted Maria, wrapped a blanket around her INCLUDING her flailing arms that had pushed me away, and thus imprisoned her. The nurse was able to remove it easily with the tweezers - a technique to remember with very small children. Another time she woke me up on a Saturday with this hideous blister on her hand covering her entire palm. Turns out that on our trip to see a NYC eye doctor the previous day (we'd treated her to Radio City Music Hall), she had slid her hand down the bannisters of all their huge staircases (I remember her joyfully doing that, and my husband indulging her in climbing them more than once) and had a humongous friction burn. The things you learn with kids! I too enjoy the content of WritersWeekly. Does it get me to get my book done? Not yet, but that's not your fault. That's old age, a Piscean procrastinating nature and vicissitudes of moving to Florida, hurricanes, a broken arm, buying a condo, etc., etc. I miss New Hampshire, so your stories of Bangor weather, etc. are also much enjoyed. Maggy …

Play-Doh-ectomy

Dear Angela, I have to thank you for sharing your "Play-Doh-ectomy" story. It helped me remember a couple of things I hadn't remembered while I was taking your last memoir class - the time I dissected the rattle we made in kindergarten, found that the rattle sound was made from popping corn kernels and decided to put them in my ears. I got the one in my left ear out, but not the one in my right. My parents had to rush me to the emergency room. I hated the whole experience and cried the whole time. They gave me a lollipop for being a good girl. Regards, Carma http://www.nasw.org/users/carms Hi Angela I laughed hysterically when I read your story about Frank and the silly putty. We had a similiar incident with beads. My youngest, Matthew, somehow got two colored beads stuck up his nose. I tried to have him blow them out but that didn't work. I phoned 'Grandma' to accompany us to the hospital. Matthew and I were in the bathroom (a small one at that) getting ready to head to the ER when he started to make the sneezing sound. Suddenly, he let out one huge sneeze and those beads came flying out of his nose and went ricocheting off the walls. With it being a small bathroom, those beads flew around for quite awhile. We were ducking for cover! Of course, once the crisis was over, we had a very good laugh. Kids - they should come with instruction manuals.. Also, like Diane C., I was published in Woman's World after reading their editorial request on your site. Thanks to WritersWeekly for the great lead! Best wishes to you and your family for a happy holiday season and continued success in the New Year. Warm regards, Christine …

Ho Ho

Happy Holidays, Angela! Another year of WritersWeekly.com is almost finished...whew! Thanks for publishing such an informative and useful ezine. I look forward to another year of your excellent publication. I hope you have a fantastic holiday this year. Peace. Michael …

Kudos!

Dear Angela, As one of your many readers, I want to let you know how much I enjoy and benefit from WritersWeekly.com. The information I have gleamed through your articles, market listings and general informational items has been and continues to be one of the great things about being part of the writing world. Your advocacy against writing for free has helped many of the new and young writers I know and work with gain confidence in their abilities to say, "No, my writing is worth you paying.". The book Query Letters That Work is an incredible piece of information full of samples and examples of how to write those pesky little things. I have participated in a couple of your on-line workshops and the motivation and information provided has twice set me off on a new line of profitable writing. I could go on and on, but let me just end here by saying that your website is worth passing on to every other writer with whom I come in contact. Keep up the good work. Dorry C. Pease LXR Group - designed for writing and working on written pieces, poetry, fiction or non-fiction http://groups.yahoo.com/group/league_xrevisionists/ http://www.freewebs.com/dcatherine

Letters To The Editor For December 8th

This Week:

  • Great Advice Regarding Firms That Run Endless Job Ads!
  • Blurring The Line Between Writer And Expert
  • More On Blurring The Line...

Shy Writers Unite!

Hi Angela, Boy am I glad you published that shy writer story. I was so shy I used to write with a pencil that had an eraser on both ends. I am doing the blog thing now, too. See: http://tenniesup.blogspot.com/ Best wishes! Kenny …

Another Bad Byproduct of Sp*m Filters

When this service was first implemented, I received up to 5-6 submissions per day that required that I "register." Now, I don't bother. If a writer wants to receive feedback from us on the status of his/her submission, they will need to pre-register our domain as one that they will allow mail from or they won't hear back from us. I have yet to bypass a submission we selected for publication because of this maddening practice, but I am prepared to do so if the need arises.…

WritersWeekly Reminds Me That I’m a Writer

I wanted to thank you because, although I'm not as immersed in writing as I'd like to be (had to go back to work full-time), your weekly newsletter reminds me that I am a writer and that I must keep it in order to reach my final goal - become a full-time author. …

Just Say NO!

Just wanted to congratulate you on the wonderful article you wrote for fundsforwriters.com about writers getting paid. Bravo! Besides being a NY Times best selling author, I am also a media coach and am constantly telling my clients "if it doesn't make dollars, it doesn't make sense!" …

Fledgling Editors Who Don’t Pay Writers

Thank you for your article on non-paying writing publications. As a newsletter editor myself for over four years, I've managed to find the funds to pay the writers who contribute to my publications even when it put me financially in the red back in the beginning. I am ever amazed at how little writers pay writers. I keep a list of writing newsletters and websites that accept submissions, and I feel I've hit the jackpot when a publication pays more than $20. I am dumbfounded at what some of the major newsletters pay with editors bragging about their own successes. Thanks for preaching the mantra of "do not write for free." (For your information...I pay writers $30 for 500-700 word articles.) C. Hope Clark http://www.fundsforwriters.com Editor's Note: Hope Clark isn't the only one who's noticed this trend. Read today's Feature Article, To Pay or Not to Pay...Fellow Writers. …

Letters To The Editor For September 1st

This Week:

  • Sites For Young Writers
  • A Pub For Young Writers
  • Book For Young Writers
  • Thanks For 10 Things NOT to Say Article

Sites Who Stole My Work Paid Up

I am writing to thank you for the article you have posted on Writer's Weekly titled How to Deal with Online Media Pirates by Alicia Karen Elkins. A couple of weeks ago I googled myself to see what might show up. Was I surprised when two articles were listed that I had no idea were posted. One I had submitted almost a year before and the other one I had never submitted. While both sites gave me credit for having written the articles, neither had contacted me for permission or payment. I read WritersWeekly.com every week and remembered reading this article. I promptly printed it up and started following the steps Alicia suggests for getting paid. It worked!! I received checks from both sites. I never had to get ugly or threatening, I just firmly demanded payment and it came through (after about three weeks). Thank you for keeping valuable articles like this on your site. It really helped this freelancer and probably many more. Best regards, Martha Miller …