Recently Answered Questions:



Q-

Can you point me to advice about the best way to mail a single copy of my book for gift, review, sales?

Plain 6×9 envelope? Bubble wrap envelope? Etc.

Any other mailing advice?

Len


A –

I have, in the past, bought sturdy yellow envelopes (11 x 14), put my book inside, folded them in half, taped the loose sides, and stuck labels on them. They’re cheaper than bubble envelopes and doing that gives the packages some extra protection. You can ship these via first class mail, which is cheaper than priority mail. I definitely do NOT recommend using media mail as those are un-trackable, un-insurable, and prone to vanishing en route to their destination. If that happens, you won’t get any compensation from the post office whatsoever.

You can also use priority mail flat rate envelopes, which are cardboard, and free. The USPS offers flat rate priority mail envelopes and you can walk into the post office, grab a handful, along with the labels, and walk out so you can fill them out at home. You can also use your own labels, or even write the recipient’s name and address by hand on the envelope. You can buy stamps for those but you MUST drop them off at a post office (actually hand them to a clerk), or hand them to your mailperson, if the package weighs more than a pound. And, most books shipped like that do.

I have found that shipping a single copy via the US Postal Service is cheaper than using UPS. However, if you’re shipping multiple books to a single location, UPS is cheaper. Of course, Fedex and other carriers are options but, in our area at least, post office and UPS locations are more plentiful, accessible, and convenient. Of course, there are also other mailing services but those require a visit to their location.

It’s far easier to simply hand a priority mail flat rate envelope to your mailperson when he or she arrives with your mail. You can even notify them that you have a pick-up by completing the online form HERE. There is no additional charge for package pick-up.

If you are planning to sending books to reviewers, please read this before you do:

Throwing Away Your Money on Review Copies?

RELATED:

Authors Beware! “Gifting” Your Kindle E-Books May BACKFIRE!

Library “Gifts” And Copyright Harvesting – AUTHOR BEWARE!

“Special Event Signings” Sell Far More Books Than Bookstore Signings! (Or “Why Should I Order Copies Of My Own Book?”)

“Free” Review Copies and Other Headaches for New Authors

“How many copies of my book can I expect to sell?”

More Q&A with Angela!

 



The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication


Practical resource outlining the self-syndication process, step-by-step. Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication for their column or articles.

http://writersweekly.com/books/4693.html



 



Yes, online book promoting can be EASY and FUN! Let us show you how, from Day 1 through Day 90…and beyond!



 

Q. – 

Hi Angela,

Several months ago, I was invited to speak at a conference in another state. They promised to buy copies of books from my publisher, and have them on hand for a book signing after my presentation.

On the day of my speech, it was determined that there were no books there for me to sign or sell. The conference organizer blamed my publisher but, on further investigation, it was discovered that the organizer didn’t place the order for the books until less than a week before the event.

I paid my own travel expenses and, while they paid me a modest speaking fee, it in no way came close to my travel expenses. I was counting on book sales to help with that and now I’m screwed.

I’m planning to do more speaking. How can I avoid this type of embarrassing and costly fiasco in the future?


A. –

I have seen this happen many times before. One conference organizer waited to order the presenter’s books until just a few days before the event, and then balked at the cost of rush printing and UPS Next Day Air shipping. Luckily, the author arrived with a box she’d purchased herself but she was furious.

My advice is to always carry plenty of your own copies on hand, which you should be able to purchase at your author discount from your publisher. Then, you can sell those directly to readers or to the conference folks. If the conference wants to purchase and resell them, you should DEFINITELY demand a check on the spot. If they can’t be trusted to buy inventory in time for an event, they can’t be trusted to pay their bills later. Selling directly to conference attendees is a safer alternative.

If you purchase copies yourself, at least then you’ll know the books will be on hand when you need them.

RELATED:

Marketing Your Book to Conference Attendees (when you’re not even there!)

Bathroom Pitches Are Bad! How To Make A Good Impression At A Writer’s Conference

Five Ways to Make (Not Spend!) Money at Conferences

What to Do When Your Book Event Organizer FAILS TO ORDER YOUR BOOKS!

Add to Your Income by Covering Conferences and Trade Shows

More Q&A with Angela!

 



Got questions about Print On Demand and Self-publishing? Ask Angela Hoy.



About The Author

AngelaPortrait72dpismall_400x400

Angela Hoy is the publisher of WritersWeekly.com, and the co-owner of BookLocker.com (one of the original POD publishers that still gets books to market in less than a month), PubPreppers.com (print and ebook design for authors who truly want to self-publish), and Abuzz Press (the publishing co-op that charges no setup fees).

WritersWeekly.com - the free marketing ezine for writers, which features new paying markets and freelance job listings every Wednesday.

BookLocker.com - According to attorney Mark Levine, author of The Fine Print, BookLocker is: "As close to perfection as you're going to find in the world of ebook and POD publishing. The ebook royalties are the highest I've ever seen, and the print royalties are better than average. BookLocker understands what new authors experience, and have put together a package that is the best in the business. You can't go wrong here. Plus, they're selective and won't publish any manuscript just because it's accompanied by a check. Also, the web site is well trafficked. If you can find a POD or epublisher with as much integrity and dedication to selling authors' books, but with lower POD publishing fees, please let me know."

Abuzz Press offers FAST and FREE book publication, but only accepts a small percentage of submissions, and only works with U.S. authors.

PubPreppers.com - "We Prep, You Publish!" Print and ebook design for authors who truly want to self-publish. Offers formatting and design services only, and then provides simple instructions for authors on where to sign up to have the print and ebook editions printed/listed/sold. Cut out the middle man. Keep 100% of what bookstores pay for your book!

Angela's POD Secrets Revealed Series can be found HERE.

Have a POD Book with another publisher? See if BookLocker can give you a better deal. (BookLocker offers "disgruntled author discounts" to those who want to move from other POD services.)

See BookLocker's publishing packages HERE.

ANGELA ON TWITTER
https://twitter.com/AngelaHoy

BOOKLOCKER ON FACEBOOK - Provides links to free excerpts!
http://www.facebook.com/booklockerbooks

ANGELA ON FACEBOOK
https://www.facebook.com/angela.hoy.750

ANGELA ON LINKEDIN
https://www.linkedin.com/pub/angela-hoy/78/719/390

Angela is the creator of the Original 24-Hour Short Story Contest!
http://24hourshortstorycontest.com/



Read More Of Angela's Articles HERE

 



The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication


Practical resource outlining the self-syndication process, step-by-step. Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication for their column or articles.

http://writersweekly.com/books/4693.html



 



Yes, online book promoting can be EASY and FUN! Let us show you how, from Day 1 through Day 90…and beyond!



 

Q –

I wanted your opinion on an article I read about promoting and selling my ebook through libraries. Do you know anything about this? Is it a legitimate way for promotion and can a person actually make money with it?

Thanks!
Chris


A –

The sad thing about libraries is you can sell them one copy of an ebook for a couple of bucks and they can then loan that out to people for years to come. They may even “loan” multiple copies of the ebook out simultaneously. There really is no way at all for you to know if a library is doing that or not…and I guarantee that IS happening in the industry. Renting an ebook to a library has the same problems. You make almost no money and they can still loan it out to anyone and everyone without paying you more. I once heard of a library that was copying ebooks onto CDs and thumbdrives for their customers, meaning multiple copies were walking out the door! Not only were authors NOT getting paid for each copy but those library patrons could then make extra copies of the books for friends, for posting online, and even to sell!

Add that to the fact that selling to libraries is HARD WORK. They are inundated with press releases, sales sheets from publishers and authors, phone calls, faxes, emails – all from people jumping up and down, yelling, “Buy my book! Buy my book!”

You can spend an hour, or two, or more trying to sell your ebook, or even your print book, to a library and, if they buy a copy at all, they will likely only buy one. In most cases, they’ll decline to buy your book altogether.

In my opinion, marketing to libraries is a waste of time. If you value your time in hours worked, like I do, it would make more sense to simply donate a copy of your print book to your local library (don’t give them the ebook!), and to focus on promoting your book online directly to readers. I definitely don’t recommend mailing free copies to numerous libraries. I know from a librarian friend of mine that most self-published books donated to libraries are never shelved. They are thrown away.

And, if they gift it, you still might find yourself in a pickle. Why? Read this:
Library “Gifts” And Copyright Harvesting – AUTHOR BEWARE!

So, if you want to do something nice for your local library, offer them a free print copy. Give them the opportunity to decline and then walk away. Why waste money on a copy of your book that they don’t want? Don’t just mail one to them, or don’t drop one off, and definitely don’t walk in and slyly put your book on their shelf! If you do, when they find it, they’re going to get upset and they will toss your book. Believe me, librarians know amateur authors do this all the time and they are used to it.

With apologies to my librarian friends out there, I must be honest:

I don’t give my local library copies of my books. It makes more sense for me to support my local library through cash donations, and by purchasing copies of books at their annual book sale. My books are my business and giving away free copies, especially ones that can be replicated, just doesn’t make any business sense at all.

If your books are your business, too, I recommend skipping the whole marketing-to-libraries routine altogether. Instead, move on to real book promotion that WORKS.

RELATED:

Whoo-Whee! Now, That’s One Snotty Librarian!
Mailing “Free” Books To Bookstores And Libraries Can Backfire
Top 10 Mistakes New Authors Make When Contacting Libraries
Do Some Professors Stock Their Libraries With “Free Desk Copies?” Yep!
“Should I offer credit to bookstores, libraries and others who want to purchase my book?” PROBABLY NOT!

Read More Ask The Expert




The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication


Practical resource outlining the self-syndication process, step-by-step. Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication for their column or articles.

http://writersweekly.com/books/4693.html





Yes, online book promoting can be EASY and FUN! Let us show you how, from Day 1 through Day 90…and beyond!



 

Q –

I have been working with AuthorHouse to publish my book. It has now been almost 2 years! I wrote to Mr. (employee’s name removed) to return my funds. Whom do I contact to join the lawsuit against them?


A –

You further reported in your letter that, after agreeing to refund your money, they have not.

I am not aware of a current class-action lawsuit against Author Solutions but, due to the number of complaints posted about them online, I figure it’s only a matter of time before they get sued again.

This is the firm that has filed two class-action lawsuits against Author Solutions:

Giskan Solotaroff Anderston & Stewart

RELATED:

SELF-PUBLISHING? – How Many Book Sales Needed to Recoup Your Investment?

Lots of Imprints and Lots of Complaints! Could You Unwittingly Crawl into Bed with Author Solutions?

Disturbing Allegations In The New Author Solutions Lawsuit!

Uh Oh! What are the Employees of Author Solutions Saying Since the Firm was Sold?! (a.k.a. AuthorHouse, iUniverse, Xlibris, Trafford, etc.)

Complaints about AuthorHouse, Complaints about Xlibris, Complaints about iUniverse, Complaints about Trafford, etc., etc.

More Q&A with Angela!



The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication


Practical resource outlining the self-syndication process, step-by-step. Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication for their column or articles.

http://writersweekly.com/books/4693.html



 



Yes, online book promoting can be EASY and FUN! Let us show you how, from Day 1 through Day 90…and beyond!



 

Q. – 

Angela,

There are some websites that offer “tracking services” for an author’s queries. Should I use these or are they a waste of time and money?


A. –

I’m not a fan of tracking services. Writers can use a simple spreadsheet to track submissions. And, most of those types of services charge a fee. Why pay someone to do something you can do for free on your own computer?

Tracking services typically publish paying markets for writers, as well as some freelance jobs. They charge writers (usually a monthly or annual fee) to access those listings. Then, writers can apply for those writing assignments through the tracking service’s website. A database keeps track of the applications writers submit and their software can then show the writer that data in different forms (lists, pie charts, etc.).

The problem is, the more paying clients (writers) belong to that service, the more each market gets flooded with submissions. So, if Tracking Service A posts a paying market, and shows it to their 5,000 paying members, that market may receive hundreds or thousands of submissions in a short period of time. So, you’ve essentially paid that tracking service to create more competition for yourself. Naturally, this will lead to a much higher rejection rate than if you’d found markets on your own that aren’t getting pinged by numerous writers in a short period of time.

Also, writers can get so caught up in the “newest” site that offers submission tracking (“Ooooh! Pie charts and bar graphs!!”) that they spend very little time actually querying and writing. They’re too busy looking at statistics, chatting with other writers online, and not really getting any money-making work done.

In my opinion, a writers’ time is better spent querying non-swamped editors and publishers.

RELATED:

QUERY LETTERS THAT WORKED! Real Queries That Landed $2K+ Writing Assignments

WritersWeekly’s Searchable Paying Markets Database

7 Paying Markets For Theme-Specific Essays!

10 Paying Creative Non-fiction Markets For Writers

Use Magazine Vendor Websites To Find New Paying Markets For Writers!

Science Writing: A Lucrative Niche (with Paying Markets)

More Q&A with Angela!



The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication


Practical resource outlining the self-syndication process, step-by-step. Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication for their column or articles.

http://writersweekly.com/books/4693.html



 



Yes, online book promoting can be EASY and FUN! Let us show you how, from Day 1 through Day 90…and beyond!



 

Q –

Angela,

Rather than go for your full-service publishing program, I signed up for your DIY program at BookLocker.com, hoping to do the work myself to save money. But, after seeing an ad from a firm that promised 5-day turn-around and really cheap prices on cover design and interior formatting, I decided to have them handle those tasks for my book. It’s now been 40 days and there’s no end in sight to their excuses.

I believe they send their work overseas, and act as a middle-man with the authors. I learned my lesson and will not go the easy route on the next books I write (two are currently in process).

What do you suggest I do to hurry them along?

J.R.


A –

You may get lucky and they may finish the job this week. If they don’t, you might consider threatening to expose their poor practices online. That might get them moving faster. There’s the unfortunate possibility that they may never finish the job at all. It’s not unusual for a contractor, who’s in over his or her head, to bolt, and stop responding to the person who hired them.

We’re seeing this more and more since we launched BookLocker’s DIY Program over a year ago. There are lots of “cheap” cover and formatting services available online. And, you’re right. Many of them subcontract work out overseas where the labor can be very inexpensive. But, the language barrier alone can cause problems, especially when authors are requesting editing changes to their interior file and cover text.

When an author allows us to format their book, and to design their cover, we usually get a book to market in less than a month. Authors who hire outside designers (who often have hidden fees) usually end up paying more in the end and the books are almost never ready in a month. Furthermore, those files almost always arrive with numerous errors. We must then send the author a note with a list of the formatting and cover errors. This results in another round of delays, and another, and another. And often, the “cheap” firm charges the author for the corrections even when the errors were not the author’s fault. They may even threaten to stop work until additional money is paid. If an author had paid a few hundred dollars, they’ll likely risk paying a little more in the hopes they won’t lose their entire investment in the end. I’ve received numerous complaints over the years of designers, artists, editors and others holding an author’s files hostage until additional money is paid.

Sometimes, the files designed by third parties arrive at our company perfect the first time but that is rare.

We try to warn authors up-front about hiring third parties they stumble upon online but there are lots of folks on a budget and I understand they’re trying to save money.

Unfortunately, if you hire a person who may have a pretty website, but who ultimately don’t know what they’re doing, you can end up paying far more to publish your book then you originally planned, and your book may be delayed by several weeks or even months while you wait for them to try to get the job done right (or get it done at all!).

When you’re considering using a cheap service to work on your book, ask them for a list of names of books they’ve worked on. Don’t ask them for a list of references. They’ll likely be fake references – a list of their family and friends who will lie for them. Rather, take the list of books, find them on Amazon, Google the authors’ names, and try to find those authors’ websites.

Write to the authors directly, on your own, and ask them how their experience was. You might find out that the service was more expensive than they claimed and that their book was published after significant delay. Worse, you might find out that service never worked on that book at all. Or, you may learn that the firm did excellent work. Don’t contact just one author. Contact several.

You can read about BookLocker’s DIY program (and others) here.

You can read about BookLocker’s Payment Plan Program here.

If you want to have your book printed yourself, and if you’re looking for a good firm that produces quality covers and interior files at a reasonable price, check out our PubPreppers.com division.

As always, whenever an author uses one of our firms, they retain ALL rights to their files. Most publishers do NOT give authors all rights to their files. Even some designers, formatters, and artists retain rights, which forces the author to hire them again, and again, and again each time they want to make changes to their files. It’s an abhorable practice but it’s become the norm in the industry.

Again, BookLocker.com and PubPreppers.com authors retain ALL rights to their production files.

RELATED:

Did You Include “Work-For-Hire” In Your Contract? No? You May NOT Own All Rights!

Work for Hire…or Indentured Servitude?

POD SECRETS REVEALED: You Pay… But THEY Own the Rights?!

Plagiarism…or Work-for-Hire?

How to Go Broke AFTER You Publish Your Book! (Hint: Buy your publisher’s worthless marketing products and services…)



The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication


Practical resource outlining the self-syndication process, step-by-step. Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication for their column or articles.

http://writersweekly.com/books/4693.html



 



Yes, online book promoting can be EASY and FUN! Let us show you how, from Day 1 through Day 90…and beyond!



 

Q. –

Angela,

Please read THIS ARTICLE 

What is Amazon up to now?


A. –

Yeah, I saw that on Tuesday. Amazon is allowing resellers to “win” buy buttons on their book pages, which means some books will no longer be for sale directly through Amazon. The resellers are only allowed to do this with “brand new” books. But, what does that mean exactly and how will this affect publishers, authors, and literary agents?

Amazon has reiterated to Publisher’s Weekly that they only allow resellers to list books if they are “brand new.”

But, what does “brand new” mean? Is it a book that has never been read? Could it be a used book in excellent condition? Could it be a remaindered book that’s also in excellent condition? Let’s face it…there are tons of resellers on Amazon selling “brand new” books that are anything but! I know because I’ve bought “brand new” books from Amazon resellers that not only weren’t new, but had frayed pages and notes written in them!

HOW THIS CAN AFFECT TRADITIONALLY PUBLISHED BOOKS:

Traditional publishers, traditionally published authors, and literary agents appear to be upset because Amazon’s resellers can buy wholesale or remaindered books at a fraction of the original cost, and sell them as new (since, essentially, they haven’t been read so they are “new” copies).

When a publisher sells a book to a retailer, they credit the literary agent or author with the royalties. If the book has an agent, the royalties are paid to the agent, who then sends the author’s portion to them. Many traditionally published authors don’t have literary agents so they are paid directly by the publisher.

When a book is remaindered, it’s typically returned to the publisher, who then gives the books a remainder mark (a magic marker slash made across the pages of a closed book near the spine), and sells them to a wholesaler, who will then sell these now-non-returnable books at a fraction of the original cost. When these books were initially “returned” to the publisher, they gave credit to the bookstore for the returned books, and they then deducted the royalties from their authors future payments.

But, what if a bookstore requests a credit from the publisher, and then sends those remainders to a wholesaler on behalf of the publisher? What if they do NOT mark those books as remainders? These books then appear to be “brand new.” They can be purchased by an Amazon reseller, and sold as brand new, despite the fact that the publisher, agent and author have now not earned any money on the sale of those books (or a fraction of what they’d have earned if the books were never remaindered).

To put it succinctly, two things have traditional publishers, authors, and agents up in arms about this:

1. Resellers may be putting these books up for sale online, which compete with brand new books that were previously sold directly by Amazon. Publishers, agents, and authors earn far less on these copies in the end…or nothing at all.

2. Many folks are perfectly happy ordering from Amazon directly but they don’t know these resellers and, thus, may not trust them. So, not having a book available for order directly through Amazon hurts sales.

HOW THIS CAN AFFECT SELF-PUBLISHED BOOKS MANUFACTURED THROUGH PRINT ON DEMAND TECHNOLOGY?:

For many print on demand book listings, these resellers are listing “new” books for sale that…don’t even exist yet. Yes, that’s right. They won’t order a copy from the distributor or publisher until/unless somebody orders a copy of that book from them. Only then will they place an order themselves. This is bad because it encourages the resellers to hijack the Amazon pages with “brand new” books for sale that, again, don’t even exist yet.

When Amazon removes their buy button, and instead refers book buyers to these resellers, they’re hurting book sales for print on demand books because, again, many people are comfortable buying from Amazon directly but far fewer trust unknown resellers on Amazon’s site. Also, if Amazon isn’t selling a book directly, that may create doubt in the buyer’s mind about the quality of that book itself.

This is just another example of Amazon doing business that hurts authors and publishers. People who don’t like it should buy their books directly from the publisher, or from a different online book retailer, like BarnesandNoble.com, Powells.com, or chapters.indigo.ca. Many authors sell books directly through their own websites so please consider that option as well when shopping for books online.

Do you have a writing- or publishing-related question for Angela? Contact her RIGHT HERE.

RELATED:

Is Your Book Suddenly “Unavailable” on Amazon? Are They Up to Their Old Tricks Again?!

Amazon Backs Down; Settles Antitrust Lawsuit Filed By BookLocker

Should You Bid For Ad Space on Amazon?

Amazon’s Actions Lead To Angry Readers, And May Have Killed My Sponsorship Deal!

My book costs $2700 on Amazon!? What?!?!

More writing and publishing Q&A!



The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication


Practical resource outlining the self-syndication process, step-by-step. Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication for their column or articles.

http://writersweekly.com/books/4693.html



 



Yes, online book promoting can be EASY and FUN! Let us show you how, from Day 1 through Day 90…and beyond!



 

Q –

I heard about your quarterly 24-hour short story contest online but, before signing up, I was wondering if there’s a place I can read past winners.

Marie


A –

The WritersWeekly Quarterly 24-Hour Short Story Contest is in its 17th year! The premise is simple. The contest topic is sent out via email (and posted online) at 12:00 p.m. (noon) central time on the day of the contest. Registered entrants then have 24 hours to write and submit their story to us via email.

Yes, you can read past winners of the contest, as well as all past topics, HERE.

PRIZES –

1st place: $300
2nd place: $250
3rd place: $200
+ 85 other prizes

Only 500 writers may participate in each contest.

The entry fee is only $5.

You can sign up RIGHT HERE.

RELATED:

(Groan!) Common Themes That Pop Up in EVERY 24-Hour Short Story Contest…

14 Tips To Give Yourself A Leg Up In Writing Contests!

24-Hour Short Story Contest Guidelines and Rules

Topic, Common Themes, and Winners of the WritersWeekly.com Winter, 2017 24-Hour Short Story Contest!

Are You a Short Story Writer? Publish your short story collections in book form!

 



The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication


Practical resource outlining the self-syndication process, step-by-step. Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication for their column or articles.

http://writersweekly.com/books/4693.html





Yes, online book promoting can be EASY and FUN! Let us show you how, from Day 1 through Day 90…and beyond!



 

Q –

Why is my book listed for $2700 on Amazon?!?!


A –

I looked at your book’s page on Amazon and it is out of print (no longer on the market). That means your publisher has ceased publishing/selling that book, and has alerted either the distributor or Amazon itself directly about the terminated status of your title.

Amazon does not remove old books pages for out-of-print books. Rather, they allow resellers to sell used copies of books on their site forever, even if no used copies of that book actually exist. The listings are all database driven. No human typed in that ridiculous price for your book.

These databases may continuously search for other sources from which to purchase out of print books. If there are very few (or no) copies available, the database may price that book exorbitantly high. The reseller may figure, if some person is willing to pay them $2700 for a paperback book, they’d certainly be willing to move Heaven and Earth to try to find an old copy of it. Of course, nobody is going to purchase a paperback for $2700.

Since these database errors are so prominent on Amazon, you’ll see all sorts of books by unknown (and known) authors, both active and out of print, priced at out-of-this-world prices. And, contacting those firms to try to get those listings fixed or removed will do no good whatsoever. Most will just ignore your correspondence.

Rest assured that these prices are NOT your publisher’s fault. They have no control of the resale cost of “used” books listed for sale by other firms.

Angela

Have a question for Angela? Fire off a message to her RIGHT HERE

RELATED:

“Why do Amazon’s resellers have my book priced too high/too low?”

New and Used Copies of Books on Amazon

Nobody’s Bought My Book…Yet There Are Used Copies For Sale Online?

What’s The Secret to Ongoing, Consistent BOOK SALES?

BookLocker’s Publishing Packages and Prices

 



The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication


Practical resource outlining the self-syndication process, step-by-step. Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication for their column or articles.

http://writersweekly.com/books/4693.html



 



Yes, online book promoting can be EASY and FUN! Let us show you how, from Day 1 through Day 90…and beyond!



 

Q. –

“My three books (it’s a series) are on Amazon and other bookstore websites. I set up a small website. I have been mentioning my book to family and friends once a week on Facebook. So, why aren’t my books selling?”


A .-

I sent these follow-up questions to the author:

Are you collecting email addresses (opt-in only!) of people who are interested in your book’s topic?

Are you creating a weekly newsletter and are you sending that to your subscribers?

If you don’t have a newsletter, are you blogging at least once a week, and notifying your email list whenever you post a new entry?

Are you on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Tumblr, Pinterest, or any other social media sites?

Have you set up a Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other social media accounts that are dedicated solely to promoting your book?

Are you practicing “comment marketing” to promote your books?

Are you doing anything else at all to promote your book?

The author responded:

That all seems like a lot of work. I am currently working on book #4 of the series.

I responded:

It’s never a good idea to keep writing more and more books for a series that isn’t selling. You should take several months off from writing to promote the books you already have on the market.

My answer to your original question is simple. Your books aren’t selling because you are not promoting them. Putting a book on Amazon isn’t going to automatically result in book sales. Posting a weekly reminder to family and friends isn’t going to sell books. While this may be difficult to hear, they’re probably tired of hearing about your books by now. If they haven’t bought one yet, they’re not going to.

If you have a one-page website that doesn’t have a free excerpt, and other website sections designed to actively excite and engage your potential readers, nobody is going to come back to your website.

Find numerous creative and fun ways to excite and engage potential readers while promoting your books in 90+ DAYS OF PROMOTING YOUR BOOK ONLINE: Your Book’s Daily Marketing Plan.

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Yes, online book promoting can be EASY and FUN! Let us show you how, from Day 1 through Day 90…and beyond!



 

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